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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 647 (some duplicates have been removed)
bakersfield, leaving harvard to go work in mississippi is -- >> bill moyers: you left before you finished your studies? >> marshall ganz: yeah, i had a year to go.
in there. he found out firsthand by traveling to the mississippi delta that something as simple challenge. ♪ ♪ keep your boom boom boom like nobody do ♪ ♪ keep your boom boom boom like nobody do ♪ >> it is often called the birthplace of the blues. these swing sounds are a welcome distraction from the region's joblessness and sparse access to health care. >> a lot of people who need insurance don't have it. i had to be one of them. >> with the fewest working family doctors per capita in the nation, many of these areas have trouble seeing a physician. they average one primary care physician forever 1700 people, worse. >> it's a hard place to live. >> in 2011, just one primary care doctor was registered in sharky county. in humphry's county where more than 9,000 people live, there were two doctors. >> there is not public transportation so people have trouble getting to providers, and you don't have a large number of providers, in particular specialists. >> so we're driving through the mississippi delta right now, and if you look around you can get a sense of how rural this place is
is ticking. it is mississippi's only abortion clinic. tensions are high between the people inside trying to save it. and the protesters outside trying to shut it down. >> there are babies being killed inside of this pink building. >> on the line, a christian doctor with a controversial answer to the question, how many abortions will he do on any one woman? >> how many abortions? as many as necessary. >> we're there as the decision comes in, the battle rages on. and they both think god is on their side. with the clinic on life support, which side wins? >> this special edition of "nightline," the last stan >>> this is a special edition of "nightline." the last stand, whose side is god on? >> good evening, i'm cynthia mcfadden. thank you for joining us, tonight we look at one of the most controversial subjects, abortion. the lines are being drawn in missouri and of course, texas, but sometimes as minds close and the lines harden, we lose sight of the people involved. tonight, we travel to the last abortion clinic in mississippi. which, as we arrive, has only 72 hours left before it appears
, mississippi. >> okay. i went to school, both public school as well as my undergraduate studies in mississippi. >> uh-huh. >> left to do my graduate work in seminary in washington, d.c. deferred a bachelor program to come back and do work in mississippi. i wanted to talk about the intersection of privilege, poverty and politics. and so because religion, politics, money are not the most important conversations to bring up around the dinner table, i knew that i would have a colorful experience, if you would, coming back home to address these challenges. >> i see. the sacred or the spiritual and the secular in the streets and the scriptures. >> absolutely. >> that's what you try to combine in your sermon. >> that's correct. making connections between not only the ideals that can be lifted into the rafters but make them make sense in people's lived experience. to talk about things that really matter is what i believe life is about. faith traditions at their best do the work of inviting people to reflect on losty ideals of making them make sense in their lived experience. >> i like that. >> so it's
secretary in mississippi. he had fought for his country in world war ii. before coming home to fight for justice here. his assassination by a white supremacist in june of 1963 helped to inspire the march on washington. joining me now is myrlie evers williams, the widow of medgar evers and a legendary civil rights leader in her own right. and historian taylor branch author of the trilogy of books on dr. king and the civil rights movement. thank you both for being on tonight. >> it's a pleasure. >> thank you. >> let me start with you ms. evers williams. your husband was killed in june of '63, and it was part of what really ignited the movement that had already started around having this march. you were the speaker at that march and didn't make it. and one of the things we're most proud of is tomorrow you're going to make that speech at lincoln memorial for the march on washington. >> well, thank you. >> 50 years later. >> thank you ever so much. >> tell us what was running through your mind as you fought in mississippi and the climate in 1963. because i don't think people understand th
's in here. he fund out firsthand by traveling to the mississippi delta that something as simple as seeing a doctor is a major challenge. ♪ ♪ >> it is often called the birthplace of the blues in the poverty stricken delta this is a welcome distraction from the region's joblessness and spark access to healthcare. ♪ ♪ >> a lot of people that need insurance don't have it. i actually happen to be one of them. >> with the few west working family doctors per capita in the nation many in mississippi's poor and rural areas have trouble seeing a physician. the magnolia state averages 1 physician for every 1700 people. in the delta it is much worse. >> it is a hard place to live. >> in 2011 just one primary care doctor was registered in this county, home to 5,000 people. here, where hou where more than0 live, there is two. >> in delta we have areas with a lot of transportation, there is not public transportation so people have trouble getting to providers and you don't have a large number of provide res, in particularly, specialists. >> so, we're driving through the mississippi delta. if y
in the mississippi delta it had finally gelled. it was going to happen, came to the brilliant organizer of the march. now, i found plenty of women on this amateur staff because byron was only one who really knew what he was doing. what they are really talking about is the stake of the civil rights movement circa 1963. it was frankly more advanced than america in general. but not significantly more. there was some consciousness among the younger women that women had not gotten the opportunities and the movement they were entitled to, that is -- we saw that absolutely. >> that was stokely carmichael's organization. >> john lewis'. >> it was carmichael -- one of the -- >> the women in the movement is -- >> that's after john and that's after the black power movement came in. one thing we also avoid is the kind of vision of history that frankly i'd like to do which is to say we stormed said why don't you make sure there's some women speakers. i think the reason that we were you ad by the march and the feminism in us did not come out yet is because we were just a few years ahead of feminist consciousness
that day. >> we must get in this revolution, and complete the revolution. for in the delta of mississippi, in southwest georgia, the black belt of alabama, in harlem, in chicago, detroit, philadelphia, and all over this nation, the black masses are on the march for jobs and freedom. >> in the five decades since, john lewis has become an icon of the civil rights movement, a hero who faced down brutal southern police in the name of freedom and was beaten bloody for daring to do so. today, he is a 14-term congressman from georgia. recently, he and i returned to the national mall in washington to remember that day in 1963 and the march that changed america. >> people were all the way down. and you just saw hundreds and thousands of individuals. i'm john lewis. and i was the youngest speaker. ten of us spoke. i spoke number six. dr. king spoke number ten. and out of the ten people that spoke that day, i'm the only one still around. >> congratulations. >> what's that? >> congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> it was a great moment in american life. >> you were his friend? >> yeah. i got to
of their dignity by signs stating "for whites only." we cannot be satisfied as long as a negro in mississippi cannot vote and a negro in new york believes he has nothing for which to vote. no, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream. i am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. some of you have come fresh from narrow jail cells. some of you have come from areas where your quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution and staggered by the winds of police brutality. you have been the veterans of creative suffering. continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive. go back to mississippi, go back to alabama, go back to south carolina, go back to georgia, go back to the louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed. let us not wallow in the valley of despair. i say to you today, my friends, so even though we face the difficulties of today and t
win it 15-13. dennis alan used to coach and look at drew brees back here. 1 mississippi, 2 mississippi, 3 mississippi, 4. he was 14 of 18202 yards and easy touchdown throw there. 17-0 saints. good numbers and 12 of 16 and $1.24. raiders were down at the break and their first team was out played. but their second teamers, they fought hard. seneca wallace by david bass and ryan robinson touchdown and raiders lose it 28-20. it is a chance to gain some ground on first place texas because the rangers lost to seattle. dan and i loosen up before every show. it gets the neck going. he is not my ennis he is yo ennis. that his his 20th homer. bottom of the seventh and he knocks in a hustling catch. he scored from first and top 9 and two men on as cabrera with a liner to third that looks scary. donaldson turns it into the game ending double play. 3-2 the final. the giants visiting south beach and playing the marlins. the two lowest scoring teams in the national league combined for 24 runs. hector sanchez set a season high in runs scored. they win a slug fest. abc7 sports brought to you by river r
-13. dennis alan used to coach and look at drew brees back here. 1 mississippi, 2 mississippi, 3 mississippi, 4. he was 14 of 18202 yards and easy touchdown throw there. 17-0 saints. good numbers and 12 of 16 and $1.24. raiders were down at the break and their first team was out played. but their second teamers, they fought hard. seneca wallace by david bass and ryan robinson touchdown and raiders lose it 28-20. it is a chance to gain some ground on first place texas because the rangers lost to seattle. dan and i loosen up before every show. it gets the neck going. he is not my ennis he is yo ennis. that his his 20th homer. bottom of the seventh and he knocks in a hustling catch. he scored from first and top 9 and two men on as cabrera with a liner to third that looks scary. donaldson turns it into the game ending double play. 3-2 the final. the giants visiting south beach and playing the marlins. the two lowest scoring teams in the national league combined for 24 runs. hector sanchez set a season high in runs scored. they win a slug fest. abc7 sports brought to you by river rock casino. >>
. she was married to another man. they ran away to the mississippi area and live together. he claims that they were married. campaign, and became a big issue and jackson never got over it. all of her life, she was embarrassed by it. she smoked a pipe. she was an excellent plantation manager. on the public side of things, no. she was very hurt by it. judge overton, a best friend of the family, wrote an essay about the scandal of not being married. they did remarry. he invited them to marry. that theyton said went to mississippi and, as they say, they were married. he would not go any further than that. >> what andrew jackson do after his term? had his wife tossed emily. she died in the second administration. oversaw the margaret o'neill scandal. known of loose morals married a member of the cabinet. they would not accept or. -- her. she had authority. the women would not call on her or receive her. mrs. jackson was not treated that way. but, peggy was not a very nice person. >> national. ille.shv jackson died 1828. he is writing to his friend and he describes the onset of rachel's ill
: smiting goliath might as well be marshall ganz's job description. it began in mississippi's freedom summer of 1964 when his fury against injustice pulled him out of harvard and into the struggle for civil rights. from there, he signed on with the legendary cesar chavez and the united farm workers and for 16 years, struggled to unionize the men and women in the fields of california who toiled endless hours and mounting days, picking crops for next to nothing. three decades after marshall ganz had dropped out of harvard, he went back to finish his degree and earn a doctorate. a few years later, he was asked to become the architect behind the obama campaign's skillful organizing of students and volunteers. today, marshall ganz is a founder of the leading change network, a global community of organizers, educators and researchers mobilizing for democracy. you'll find more of his experience and philosophy in this book, "why david sometimes wins" marshall ganz, it's good to meet you. >> marshall ganz: it's good to meet you, bill. >> bill moyers: stories have been a powerful part of your life. wh
be satisfied as long as the negro in mississippi cannot vote and the negro in new york believes he has nothing for which to vote. no, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream. i am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. some of you have come fresh from narrow jail cells. some of you have come from areas where your quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution, and staggered by the winds of police brutality. you have been the veterans of creative suffering. continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redementive. go back to mississippi. go back to alabama. go back to south carolina. go back to georgia, go back to louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities. knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed. let us not wallow in the valley of despair. i say to you today, my friend friends -- [ cheers and applause ] >> -- though even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow i still hav
of several historical novels he spoke for a little more than an hour in jackson, mississippi. >> the reason for me to be in jackson maybe more so than any other is what took place 40 miles west of here and that is what i want to talk about tonight. at vicksburg, so this is quite a story and even some people around here don't know it. that is great fun for me but i need to start out talking about something that i always mention whenever i'm doing any event like this. i am quite sure that at least some of you have some interest in the civil war for one reason, because at of some time many years ago perhaps you read a book called the killer angels. every time i say that i see people nod their heads. you have no idea what the killer angels is that's okay. it's not required. i'll explain it to you quickly. the killer angels was written by my father and came out in 1974. it is the story of the battle of gettysburg. now with the killer angels is not is the history of the battle of gettysburg. it's not a history book. it's the story as told to you from the characters themselves and not just any cha
see the city name down on the lower left, mississippi. the number next to the city is the derivative of the gps marker for this google location and i sort of transposed the numbers and used that. i wanted to connotate that virtual world and also there was a visual connection to the photographic heritage that was pretty wild. on top of this moment in time, there is also a breaking down of the imagery thaps in the google pictures themselves, most of these are lo fi and i chose that i guess because of the esthetics. it did not contain the same look as these and it also erode the truth and makes the lens a little bit blurry, it alters things from a technical point of view. so, you could see these pictures that sort of describe them as drive-by pictures that we are drive-by really captures this and not necessarily immersive in any way. it is literally a car driving by capturing a moment. some of this has been done in the past, walker evans took pictures out of a moving vehicle. in fact, strangely, right upstairs in the library before this talk i was looking through my side and i have on t
guarding the strategically vital mississippi trade route. in the springtime thousands flock to 'rendezvous' the spirited 18th century fur trapper holiday. friendly site supervisors give you the history which includes a free tour of the museum the exhibits and air conditioning the perfect remedy to a hot day of paddling. we're in the northern end of the colony of louisiana, at that time. this fort is governed from new orleans. its a journey into the past you wont soon forget. coming up we're crusin' with my dog, chuck, looking for pet- friendly destinations. ♪my school bus is my limo my school bus is my limo♪ ♪chauffer? you know, fer' sho'♪ ♪man, my school bus is my limo♪ ♪new cap with my brim low ridin' in my limo♪ ♪new hoodie new jeans a few dollars got me in those♪ ♪back to school with a brand new backpack♪ ♪ain't no fool, got a matching pencil case♪ ♪got pencils full in a fat stack♪ ♪'cause mom's a member of shop your way (ay...ay...ay)♪ ♪stop signs come out and can't no one pass♪ ♪stop signs come out and can't no one pass (fades)♪ go back-to-
. they ran away to the natchez-mississippi area, the territory. and lived together and later claimed they were married. campaign, it became a real issue and jackson never got over it because he said it ultimately. all her life, she was embarrassed by it. she was a pioneer woman, she a pipe, a corn cob pipe. and was a very excellent plantation manager. the public side of things, no. and she was very, very hurt by it. now, judge overton, the best riend of the family, wrote an essay about the scandal of the not being married because they did remarry. advised them to marry when jackson became famous and that tennessee. the whole detail. he gets up. goes to mississippi, to natchez. say, they were married. he wouldn't go any further than that. >> what did andrew jackson do the rest of his term? two terms, really? as far as the first lady? hostess? wife's niece for the second administration. he died in the second administration. she was popular. but she left over the flutter of the margaret o'neill scandal of very loose he -- a morals -- known for loose morals. he married a member of the th
to coach under saints boss peyton. breeze 1 mississippi 2 mississippi 3 mississippi 4 mississippi. got all day to find a receiver and hit stills. 14 of 18 for 202 yards. 17 nothing saints. buck 24 on the money due to moore. raiders down at the half. then defense comes through. quarterback wallace hit hard by 7 round pick bass. robinson for the scoop and score but raiders fall in new orleans 28-20. cal football team open up the season in just two week against northwestern. have a true freshman taking the snap head coach dikes has named goff the starting quarterback today. 4 star recruit out of may run catholic high school. big guy. 6 foot 4 very consistent. he can thank his dad jerry for the strong am. major league pitcher never pressured his son. >> s when i was younger i raised me to play the fwaip. talk to him before the game he said have fun. i try to do. have if you please do my job and play football. >>reporter: a open up a weekend series with cleveland tonight. chance to gain some ground on first place texas because the rangers lost early this evening to seattle. thi
finishing up my new book and this particular chapter is about sex. apparently mississippi is the dumbest state. that would concur in the sex chapter because they have the most std's in america. >> mississippi is burning. >> wow. >> bill, ninety 8% of the people sur -- 98% of the people surveyed say the worst state is whatever one you happen to be in at the time. thought? >> i don't like the theme of the show. this study proved the united states of america is like one big new york apartment. we don't know anything about our neighbors and everything we know is completely wrong. i brought this back to new york because we are rude and era gapt. arrogant. >> new york won best sports fans. you can make a case or not. but it also won worst sports fans. the last time i checked boston is not in new york. >> you just proved your point. >> coming up, what is it like to be owned more than anybody else on twitter. first, what is up with the obama's new dog? something impeachable i'm sure. pbjócqkb+ámñt>zyû >> sunny is a portuguese water dog. clearly we must discuss this important news in the -- >
said we cannot rest and be satisfied as long as black folk in mississippi could not vote. and those in new york believed that they had nothing for which to vote. today the united states supreme court, having recently eviscerating the voting rights act and with numerous states clamoring to legislatively codify voting suppression measures, not only must we not be satisfied but we must fight back boldly. too many of our unknown heroes and she ros fought, bled and died for us to have the precious rights of vote. for us to now sit back and timidly allow our franchise to be taken away or diminished, we must not rest until the congress of the united states restores the voting rights act protections discard bid a supreme court blind to the blatant tests of the black folks. paramount to martin luther king jr.'s fervent dream was the commitment that african americans gain full economic opportunity and not be confined to basic mobility forward from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. today, with 12% unemployment rates in the african american community and 38% of all children of color in this cou
-- i'm sure other people have those influences, but being born in memphis, tennessee on the mississippi river, and having made my living playing down there on beale street, those particular elements created this booker t. jones style. tavis: so you know a bit about my back story. i know more about yours. but the reason why i love this instrument so much, this hammond b-3, is because long before i'd ever heard of ray charles, long before i heard of jimmy smith, i'm a kid growing up in a pentecostal church. >> oh, i see. tavis: so i fall in love with -- and i was choir director when i was -- people don't know this, but i was choir director of two choirs for years at my pentecostal church, -- [indiscernible] -- in indiana. so i fell in love with this instrument through the church. i raise that because you mentioned ray charles earlier, as did i, for that matter. but ray had a moment in his career where he was catching hell, for lack of a better phrase, for taking that instrument and taking that sound >> absolutely. tavis: and secularizing it. >> absolutely. tavis: did you have a similar jo
in mississippi. >> we can do 400,000. >> reporter: 400,000 in one day? >> pounds, yes. >> that is a lot of fish. >> that is a lot of fish. >> reporter: he's one of the biggest catfish processors in the country and one of the driving forces for getting the u.s. department of agriculture to inspect catfish grown here and imported. critics call that a huge waste of taxpayer money. there is one big problem. >> you already have the fda inspecting seafood. >> that's not correct. we have fda but that's a nonexistent inspection. >> reporter: believe it or not, two federal agencies are supposed to inspect the same fish. the usda spent $20 million just for planning those inspections. while there have been concerns about the adequacy of inspections of imported fish in the past, do we need usda inspection, too? >> we would say there is food safety concern. >> no. a catfish is a catfish is a catfish. it's a safe food. >> reporter: david acheson is one of the country's foremost food safety experts who says catfish is not a high risk food and the fda should continue to be in charge of inspecting it. >> the on
: immigration reform. shirley barbara says that this makes good sense. the mississippi governor says it makes good economic sense as well. the governor is here to explain why republicans are embracing something that is flawed, but better than getting nothing done at all. reading what you're trying to do here, it sounded a lot like the position that president obama has. better that than nothing. is that right? >> welcome i don't know the president obama will admit that what we've got is a total failure. the worst thing we can do is nothing. because the current system will just give us more of the same. more legal immigrants. it is the equivalent of amnesty. the senate has passed a big comprehensive bill that i think advances the ball down the field from. but i think it is a long way from perfect. and republicans in the house have the opportunity to take that as a starting point and give us a really first-rate immigration reform that will get control of the borders seriously. that will surely enforce the people who have visas to come here, that we make sure that they we when they are supposed t
nation may be more divided than back then. i am from mississippi. my father worked heavily to desegregate schools in mississippi. my mother did not have a black high school, my about father had to build it. lori: as reverend jesse jack jackson pointed out, african-americans are freer but less equal. >> that does reflect my sentiment. unemployment in black community is on the increase. we -- >> 12-point 6%. black unemployment. versus 6.6, reverend. >> it is not just a black problem. there are disparities in other communities, they have benefitted by that movement. i think all of us have to get engaged. not just a government problem. that is a key point president obama mentioned. everyone has to get involved am 73% of children born out of wedlock that is the government, some individuals need to hear what is happening at their children, in living rooms, men and women need to take responsibility. >> lori, reverend is right, government is supposed to protect the consumer, but up to individual responsibility, "it takes a village" to raise a child. with everything going on in the communities, we
a century in the making. edith hill cannon grew up in the '60s in mississippi. >> as much as my parents tried to protect me, you couldn't escape discrimination. >> reporter: do you ever forget the discrimination? >> uh-huh. no. >> reporter: she listened to a who's who of celebrities and politicians including the daughters of two presidents, lynda johnson robb and caroline kennedy and two former presidents, jimmy carter and bill clinton. >> this march and that speech changed america. they opened minds, they melted hearts and they moved millions. >> reporter: the event included a recreation of the 1963 march through the streets of washington that ended at the lincoln memorial. setting up a nearly five-hour program under cloudy skies and periodic rain. congressman john lewis returned today, the only speaker here to share the stage in 1963 with dr. king. >> this moment in our history has been a long time coming but a change has come. >> reporter: bill tate says he was here, too, 50 years ago. that day when dr. king made that speech, what were you thinking then? >> i knew we were in a moment
to have anita thompson here, from mississippi, because 48 years ago, there were drive-by shootings at headstart programs in her state, and some toloyers were threatening not send their children to headstart. we have come some way, and we have a ways to go. and earlyeadstart childhood education programs were serving a scant 40% of all eligible children. waiting lists or long. -- were long. rising fixed costs and rent, energy. we have almost always operated at the margins because it seems inconceivably -- inconceivable not to spend every available dollar on providing the best quality program for every possible child. when the unthinkable happened and sequestration became the new reality this march, we had little left to cut. you recently saw -- you have likely seen the recent report that over 57,000 fewer children will be served in head start and early head start next year because of the sequester. this is not a small number. numbercrunching thinkers in our team figured out that 57,000 people would fill a football stadium at the university of louisville. they would fill 1900 school m
of this great tabloid from england and you will see this is his common-law wife a and then "mississippi burning" because wait until you hear how scarpa senior saul's the "mississippi burning" case. scarpa sr. had various nicknames, the killing machine, he thought he had a license to kill and he would sign the notes killing machine they called him career reaper, the mad hatter, hannibal lector because he was stopped counting after 50 birder's that makes him the most prolific killer pardon to stop counting and makes the wood of the top serial killers of all time he only did 30 years -- 30 days out of 30 years in prison he was a topic for mint his memos went directly to j. edgar hoover himself. three separate crime organized strike force in chicago, a brooklyn tried to put him away in the justice department tried to get this mad killer of history and other members of the fbi who are protecting him to keep them on the street. these are couple of homicides in the upper left corner he shot him while he was stringing christmas tree lights with his wife at his house. nicky was sitting in his toyota whe
trying to change b this country. he was the naacp's first field secretary in mississippi. he had fought for his country in world war ii. before coming home to fight for justice here. his assassination by a white supremacist in june of 1963 helped to inspire the march on washington. joining me now is myrlie evers williams, the widow of medgar evers and a legendary civil rights leader in her own right. and historian taylor branch author of the trilogy of books on dr. king and the civil rights movement. thank you both for being on tonight. >> it's a pleasure. >> thank you. >> let me start with you ms. evers williams. your husband was killed in june of '63, and it was part of what really ignited the movement that had already started around having this march. you were the speaker at that march and didn't make it. and one of the things we're most proud of is tomorrow you're going to make that speech at lincoln memorial for the march on washington. >> well, thank you. >> 50 years later. >> thank you ever so much. >> tell us what was running through your mind as you fought in mississippi and th
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 647 (some duplicates have been removed)

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